Michelin’s hydrogen-powered endurance race car to debut at Goodwood Festival

by Autocar Pro News Desk , 07 Jul 2021


Tyre manufacturer Michelin will present a hydrogen-powered race car at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed, with the goal of entering it into the electric-hydrogen category at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 2024.

The racer, dubbed LMPH2G, is fuelled by a four-stack hydrogen fuel cell sending power to four electric motors. Michelin says it produces a combined output of 653bhp with a top speed in excess of 185mph. 

The firm will also present a new race tyre that is made up of 46% sustainable materials. The tyre consists of recycled carbon from end-of-life tyres, orange and lemon peel, sunflower oil, pine resin and recycled steel from packaging. 

“Michelin has pledged to make all of its tyres with 100% sustainable materials by 2050 – and by 2030, 40% of all materials used in tyres across the group will be sustainable,” the firm said.

The company also said it will use endurance racing as a laboratory to accelerate the development of sustainable, high-performance tyres, in partnership with hydrogen firm Green GT. 

“The partnership highlights Michelin’s drive to innovation and it is the perfect vehicle to feature Michelin’s 46% sustainable tyres,” said Peyman Sabet, vice-president of business development at Michelin Europe North.

“Both pioneering developments honour the company’s commitment to sustainability, without compromising on performance. We are delighted to bring [the LMPH2G car] to the Goodwood Festival of Speed and really excited that fans will be able to watch it take on the hill,” Sabet said.

The car will take to Goodwood’s famous hillclimb and will be displayed on the French firm’s paddock stage at the Festival of Speed. 

It was built in a joint venture with French parts giant Faurecia, which, with Michelin, jointly owns Symbio, a hydrogen fuel cell producer. The firm aims to produce 200,000 fuel cells a year by 2030.

 Jack Warrick, Autocar UK

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