Has-to-be provides software and services for IONITY

by Autocar Pro News Desk , 11 Jan 2019


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IONITY has partnered with Austrian tech company, has·to·be that has developed intelligent software for the management of electrical charging infrastructures. The product is called ‘be.ENERGISED’. It is said to be deployed successfully at more than 12,000 charging stations worldwide. The software is not tied to a specific device type, but is compatible with almost all charging stations in the market. This makes has·to·be’s solutions attractive for large companies all over the world.

IONITY is a joint venture of the automobile manufacturers BMW Group, Daimler AG, Ford Motor Company and the Volkswagen Group, together with Audi and Porsche to establish and operate a network of efficient fast-charging stations for electric vehicles along Europe’s main traffic routes.

CEO of has-to-be, Martin Klässner said, “Our software ensures the stable operation of the charging stations and enables simple billing, regardless of which charging card the customer wants to use. Even contactless direct payment at the charging station is possible. We also operate the hotline, which customers call if something doesn’t work. We always act as a white-label provider. This means that the end customer does not see us, but only enjoys the quality of the processing.”

has-to-be mobile app

A screenshot of be.ENERGISED app

However, the partnership between IONITY and has·to·be does not end with these services and will be intensified in the future. For example, the companies work closely together on calibration law. The common goal is to create a charging infrastructure for the ‘Super High Chargers’ that comply with calibration law. This way, in the near future, IONITY will be able to offer charging processes that have been correctly registered under calibration law once the standard tests have been completed. For the customers, this means maximum security for the billing of their refueling operations. Super-fast charging points will be available throughout Europe every 120 kilometers, charging empty batteries in just a few minutes.


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